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[dinosaur] Theropods from Late Jurassic to mid-Cretaceous of Southeast Asia




Ben Creisler
bcreisler@gmail.com

A new paper:


Adun Samathi, Phornphen Chanthasit & Paul Martin Sander (2019)
A review of theropod dinosaurs from the Late Jurassic to mid-Cretaceous of Southeast Asia.
Annales de PalÃontologie (advance online publication)
doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.annpal.2019.03.003
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0753396919300151


Several non-avian theropod dinosaurs, as well as some Mesozoic birds, have been reported from Southeast Asia. The fossils are dominantly found in northeastern Thailand, however, one bizarre theropod has been described from Laos, one theropod has been reported from Malaysia, and some avian and non-avian theropods have been recently reported from Myanmar. The temporal distribution of Southeast Asian theropods ranges from the Late Jurassic to the mid-Cretaceous. All non-avian theropod faunas from Southeast Asia consist of non-maniraptoran tetanurans. They show similarity to Chinese plus Japanese theropods during the Early Cretaceous in broad systematic terms. During this time, megaraptorans can be found only in Japan, Australia, Brazil, and possibly Thailand, whereas tyrannosauroids can be found in China, Europe, possibly Brazil and Australia. Spinosaurids, carcharodontosaurians, and some coelurosaurs such as ornithomimosaurs were almost cosmopolitan. Metriacanthosaurids, on the other hand, were endemic to Europe and Asia including China and Thailand during the Middle to Late Jurassic.




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