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Re: [dinosaur] An etymological question



Ben Creisler
bcreisler@gmail.com


I think the ICZN Code allows both spellings--that is, spellings from Latin or Greek that had a stem form in -idis or -idosÂ+ idae, or the more euphonic shortened form with -idae.

Greek teuthis genitive teuthidos (stem teuthid-)
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0057%3Aentry%3Dteuqi%2FsÂÂ


ICZN

29.3.1.1. If the stem so formed ends in -id, those letters may be elided before adding the family-group suffixes. If, however, the unelided form is in prevailing usage, that spelling is to be maintained, whether or not it is the original spelling.ÂÂ

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On Wed, May 22, 2019 at 6:13 PM Tyler Greenfield <tgreenfield999@gmail.com> wrote:
Another related question that just came to mind is the use of the -ididae ending. Tusoteuthis is currently placed in the family Enchoteuthididae Larson, 2010, yet some subsequent authors have adopted the spelling Enchoteuthidae. Which of these spellings would be the correct one and in which cases must -ididae be used?

On Fri, May 17, 2019 at 7:42 AM Tyler Greenfield <tgreenfield999@gmail.com> wrote:
I think the Latin "crushed, fragmented" etymology makes the most sense given the condition of the holotype. The Spanish "shortened, cropped, docked" would be oxymoronic in combination with longa. TheÂFilipino "cunning" doesn't apply to the fossil and I doubt a late 1800's American paleontologist would be familiar with this language. Thank you for all of your replies.

On Thu, May 16, 2019 at 11:13 PM Ben Creisler <bcreisler@gmail.com> wrote:
Ben Creisler

The original description can also be read here, but there is no obvious clue to the name that I can see at the moment.


==
My tentative guess for now...

Tusoteuthis "crushed squid" or "fragmented squid"??? (Latin tusus "crushed"Â+ Greek teuthis "squid")??

Latin tusus "beaten, crushed" [fragmented]Â past particle of Latin tundo





I'm not completely convinced--but maybe "crushed squid" or "fragmented squid" for the usual broken up or fragmentary condition of the fossils, as mentioned by Logan on page 498 above:

"Fragments of the shafts of Tusoteuthis longus or allied forms are abundant in the Ornithostoma beds, but complete specimens are extremely rare." Â


Âand Williston's earlier description (1897):

One or more forms of chondrophorus dibranchiates are not at all rare, though almost always represented by unrecognizable fragments. The nature of these fragments was for years a great puzzle to me. They are usually but a few inches in length, and are of a glistening fibrous character. Recently a nearly complete specimen collected by Mr. H. T. Martin has shown them to belong to a large cuttle fish, apparently different from any described genus. The gladius measures about six inches in width by at least a foot in length, and has the sepia bag about two inches wide and an inch thick below it. The surface is smooth, lustrous, its material rather shaly and soft. I have observed the shafts most frequently in the Hesperonis beds, but they may be as abundant in the lower strata.


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On Thu, May 16, 2019 at 9:08 PM Richard W. Travsky <RTravsky@uwyo.edu> wrote:

Well this got my curiosity going.

Â

Dropping "tuso" into google translate, it detects it as filipino but gives two different translations depending whether it is capitalized or not: "Tuso" = "crap" while "tuso" = "cunning".

Â

A reddit page from four months ago asks for a translation

Â

https://www.reddit.com/r/biology/comments/acarqx/etymology_of_tusoteuthis/

Â

which likewise echoes "cunning".

Â

The Logan 1898 reference is on line in google books where the name just appears and with no meaning given (I note that it's referred to as T. longus, not longa).

Â

< https://books.google.com/books?id=9QDjAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA497&lpg=PA497&dq=tusoteuthis&source=bl&ots=djiPc4HQpP&sig=J1_3jdFAyCWJ5j8jWcHQ9QUQsNk&hl=en&sa=X&ei=ikQ9UOT4COreigLcroHgAg&ved=0CDcQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=tusoteuthis&f=false>

Â

Â

wiktionary gives several choices, even in esperanto

Â

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/tuso

Â

where an etymology for the Spanish "tuso" is given as

Â

"From the irregular old past participle of the verb tundir, corresponding to Latin tonsus"

Â

where tonsus translates as "shorn". Other meanings are docked, cropped, dog, and as a verb, to shear or trim.

Â

Logan compares it to Teuthopsis, but

Â

"differs from that genus in having a lanceolate instead of a spatulate gladius, and a thicker, shorter shaft"

Â

Shorter? As in, trimmed, cropped, shorn â? After being all over the map, that's the only clue I see. That would mean mixing Spanish in with the Greek and Latin which I suppose is ok.

Â

Wow, that was fun.

Â

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From: dinosaur-l-request@usc.edu [mailto:dinosaur-l-request@usc.edu] On Behalf Of Tyler Greenfield
Sent: Thursday, May 16, 2019 6:46 PM
To: dinosaur-l@usc.edu
Subject: [dinosaur] An etymological question

Â

Â

Hopefully this question isn't too off-topic for the DML considering it involves a prehistoric invertebrate, but I know some here are more knowledgeable about etymologies than I am. Something that has been bothering me in particular is the etymology of Tusoteuthis longa Logan, 1898. While the wordsÂteuthÃs (Gr. "squid")ÂandÂlonga (Lat.Â"long") are well-documented, I've never been able to find a language or meaning for tuso. Neither the original description nor any following papers contain an explanation. Does anyone know the origin of this word?


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