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Re: [dinosaur] Tyrannosaurus rex cranial kinesis



Some news and blog updates and a video:

T. rex used a stiff skull to eat its prey

https://phys.org/news/2019-09-rex-stiff-skull-prey.html

https://munews.missouri.edu/news-releases/2019/0925-t-rex-used-a-stiff-skull-to-eat-its-prey/


T. rex's Skull-Shattering BiteÂÂ

http://dontmesswithdinosaurs.com/?p=2329&fbclid=IwAR388AAu-v_8xo8NKYnumTik43gxpi_0sYKwmnebyM3w1KHmEGw3ul-8cT8

video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=-SQjv66NOZs

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On Mon, Jul 1, 2019 at 9:20 AM Ben Creisler <bcreisler@gmail.com> wrote:

Ben Creisler
bcreisler@gmail.com


A new paper:


Ian N. Cost, Kevin M. Middleton, Kaleb C. Sellers, M. Scott Echols, Lawrence M. Witmer, Julian L. Davis & Casey M. Holliday (2019)
Palatal biomechanics and its significance for cranial kinesis in Tyrannosaurus rex.
The Anatomical Record (advance online publication)
doi: https://doi.org/10.1002/ar.24219
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ar.24219


The extinct nonâavian dinosaur Tyrannosaurus rex, considered one of the hardest biting animals ever, is often hypothesized to have exhibited cranial kinesis, or, mobility of cranial joints relative to the braincase. Cranial kinesis in T. rex is a biomechanical paradox in that forcefullyâbiting tetrapods usually possess rigid skulls instead of skulls with movable joints. We tested the biomechanical performance of a tyrannosaur skull using a series of static positions mimicking possible excursions of the palate to evaluate Postural Kinetic Competency in Tyrannosaurus. A functional extant phylogenetic bracket was employed using taxa which exhibit measurable palatal excursions: Psittacus erithacus (foreâaft movement) and Gekko gecko (mediolateral movement). Static finite element models of Psittacus, Gekko, and Tyrannosaurus were constructed and tested with different palatal postures using anatomicallyâinformed material properties, loaded with muscle forces derived from dissection, phylogenetic bracketing, and a sensitivity analysis of muscle architecture and tested in orthal biting simulations using element strain as a proxy for model performance. Extant species models showed lower strains in naturallyâoccurring postures compared to alternatives. We found that foreâaft and neutral models of Tyrannosaurus experienced lower overall strains than mediolaterallyâshifted models. Protractor muscles dampened palatal strains, while occipital constraints increased strains about palatocranial joints compared to jawâjoint constraints. These loading behaviors suggest that even small excursions can strain elements beyond structural failure. Thus, these postural tests of kinesis, along with the robusticity of other cranial features, suggest that the skull of Tyrannosaurus was functionally akinetic.

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